Nuclear Accident In New Mexico Is Still Being Censored - $2 Billion Cleanup

When a drum containing radioactive waste blew up in an underground nuclear dump in New Mexico two years ago, the Energy Department rushed to quell concerns in the Carlsbad desert community and quickly reported progress on resuming operation.

*Image Source

According to a story by The Verge, nearly 70,000 tons of nuclear waste sits outside nuclear power plants across the country. For the last half-century, scientists and politicians have struggled to create a viable solution for permanent waste disposal at Yucca Mountain, located 90 miles outside Las Vegas. They've failed. As the political dust settles over Yucca, eyes turn to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, outside of Carlsbad, New Mexico. Understandably, no one wants to have a nuclear waste facility in their community, yet we must take responsibility for it and the clock is ticking.

To gain more understanding into this ongoing conflict, definitely check out The Verge's video below, it's packed filled with vital information - information that directly effects each and every bit of life on this planet.

Dealing with this extremely deadly waste, is proving to be very challenging - and there is still not a viable resolution. One thing that is clear is that it is more important than ever, that we we transition immediately away from nuclear energy to renewable/ free energy sources. (source)

And you will see from the first video below, how very sensitive these areas are and how dangerous they are to manage. And if you are a resident of New Mexico, heads up in regards to radioactivity. It may be worthwhile to invest in an radiation detector. We do know that at least 13 workers at the plant were hurt.

When a drum containing radioactive waste blew up in an underground nuclear dump in New Mexico two years ago, the Energy Department rushed to quell concerns in the Carlsbad desert community and quickly reported progress on resuming operation.
The early federal statements gave no hint that the blast had caused massive long-term damage to the dump, a facility crucial to the nuclear weapons cleanup program that spans the nation, or that it would jeopardize the Energy Department’s credibility in dealing with the tricky problem of radioactive waste. But the explosion ranks among the costliest nuclear accidents in U.S. history, according to a Times analysis.
The long-term cost of the mishap could top $2 billion, an amount roughly in the range of the cleanup after the 1979 partial meltdown at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant in Pennsylvania.

The Feb. 14, 2014, accident is also complicating cleanup programs at about a dozen current and former nuclear weapons sites across the U.S. Thousands of tons of radioactive waste that were headed for the dump are backed up in Idaho, Washington, New Mexico and elsewhere, state officials said in interviews. (source)

 

Read Full The Verge Article Here: Wasteland: the 50-year battle to entomb our toxic nuclear remains

Related Article: Nuclear accident in New Mexico ranks among the costliest in U.S. history

Related Video: Trump budget revives plan to store nuclear waste inside Yucca Mountain

 They were sending robots down into the area to check it out. Something happened where the robots malfunctioned and it took longer than expected.
(source)

VIDEO #1: Nuclear Accident In New Mexico Is Still Being Censored, $2 Billion Cleanup

VIDEO #2: New Mexico admits nuclear plant leaking radiation